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Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Definition

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a childbirth injury that develops over multiple prolonged childbirths. Over time, muscles supporting pelvic organs weaken. The organs drop, push against the vagina, and sometimes fall out. POP is common in areas where fertility rates are high like in sub-Saharan Africa.

Life with Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Women with POP may struggle to perform daily activities such as walking, sitting or lifting heavy loads. They experience pain and embarrassment. Though they suffer from different injuries, women with POP typically experience much of the same rejection and isolation as women with fistula.

Cure for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

As with obstetric fistula, POP can be healed with surgery, but physical therapy is often needed to work in tandem with surgery in order to achieve full recovery and range of motion. Women with POP also benefit from our holistic care programming –which can include therapy and job training.

How Common is Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

It is difficult to estimate the number of women who suffer from POP worldwide because embarrassment prevents women from coming forward. A preliminary, ongoing survey of three regions of Ethiopia estimated that 5,000 to 6,000 women have obstetric fistula, while over 250,000 suffer from POP.

Donate!

If you live in the United States and have POP, seek help at augs.org